The BIG, commerce Podcast

The Art of Harnessing Customer Reviews for e-commerce, with Charlotte Talesnick from Yotpo.

August 08, 2023 Calashock Commerce
The BIG, commerce Podcast
The Art of Harnessing Customer Reviews for e-commerce, with Charlotte Talesnick from Yotpo.
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wondered how to make the most of customer reviews in your e-commerce strategy? Joined by our insightful guest, Charlotte Talesnick from Yotpo, we unpack the magic of review analytics and their transformative impact on e-commerce.

In today's digital era, customer feedback is more than words - it's a compass guiding businesses towards improvement. As we continue our chat with Charlotte, we discuss the power of customer insights and how they can help refine products and services. Hear about Yotpo's AI-driven sentiment algorithm, a great tool to identify key customer sentiments and ACAI's successful adoption of this tool. As we navigate the e-commerce landscape, we also examine the rising trends, giving a nod to SMS marketing and customer retention strategies. Tune in to this episode for a deep dive into the world of e-commerce.

Speaker 1:

Hi, welcome to the Big Commerce Podcast. Hello and welcome to a brand new episode of the Big Commerce Podcast. I'm your host, luigi, and this week I'm joined by Charlotte Bell from Yoppo. Yoppo is an e-commerce marketing platform that offers an array of different products, such as loyalty referrals, reviews, sms marketing, email marketing and user-generated content. In the conversation today, we covered how merchants can harness reviews, why they should be part of their e-commerce strategy and how they can also leverage things like loyalty referrals and SMS to better engage in high-convert customers. I hope you enjoy the episode. Hey, charlotte, welcome to the podcast.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, I'm super excited to be on.

Speaker 1:

It's super excited to have you on. I know we were meant to record this a couple of months ago, but that got moved. I'm looking forward to talking to you about reviews today. For those who don't know, you want to introduce yourself and Yoppo.

Speaker 2:

Perfect. My name is Charlotte Bell and I am a partner manager at Yoppo. I have been in partnerships at Yoppo for just about four years actually, and to give you some background on Yoppo for those that don't know it, I know some might not know how to pronounce it, some might not know what it stands for, but Yoppo's e-commerce retention marketing platform helps brands win and retain customers for life with reviews, sms marketing, loyalty and referrals, subscriptions and visual, user-generated content. The company was founded in 2011 after the CEO, tomer, had a bad experience buying a camera online and was burned by trusting fake reviews. We started as a reviews platform and now we have a full suite of connected products.

Speaker 1:

Thank you very much. What does Yoppo stand for? I know the answer to this one, but I wish you didn't ask me. Come on.

Speaker 2:

For opinion, the people's opinion.

Speaker 1:

There we go. Just because sometimes it's within an A, I mean I get it with Call of Shock. It's kind of what does it stand for? And it doesn't stand for anything. It's quite unique, but obviously Yoppo.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I should have asked you the question right back.

Speaker 1:

I'm sure I've said this before in the podcast, but I'll get Verena to organize a session about the branding and the name of Call of Shock, because it's a really boring story, but it might help give someone some inspiration. Of course, obviously, we've worked together for a few years and the platform's grown as well. I think you've acquired a couple of different things that connect into your system to become a marketing platform, but fundamentally, you started off, like you said, with reviews, so let's just focus on that. How can Yoppo help businesses in terms of review management? Because, also, e-commerce platforms have reviews that are out of the box and there are other systems. So, as a merchant, you get quite a bit of choice as to how you should manage reviews, and I think it's.

Speaker 1:

I still feel that when I speak to merchants it's something that's under estimated and maybe they don't really fully understand. I get the question such as does commerce handle reviews all the way through to which platform should we go with? Can we integrate with different systems? So I guess, starting at the beginning, how can Yoppo help businesses when they come into this part of their marketing discussion?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, definitely. So we have the smartest review solution on the market Our AI-driven smart prompts. We have smart filters. They both help brands to collect high-quality reviews that drive conversion and display them where they will have the most impact. So we have integrations with Google, shopify, walmart, facebook, instagram and more, and this is so that brands can expand their reach beyond their sites and showcase their best reviews really wherever their shoppers are.

Speaker 1:

And I think that's one of the challenges that merchants come up against. It's kind of like you know, my customers can leave reviews wherever, and so you know how do I choose the right platform, how do I consolidate them.

Speaker 2:

And how do you get them to show everywhere?

Speaker 1:

Exactly, Exactly, Because also, I mean, I don't know if it's true, but different platforms, I guess, are for different people. So if you're looking at kind of, you know a lot of people use Google for predominantly, I guess, service reviews rather than kind of products. But you're a bit more kind of holistic in that approach and that you can. You basically can help them consolidate all that and help merchants to push out product reviews to their customers that can then be used on different platforms.

Speaker 2:

Exactly.

Speaker 1:

So it forms part of kind of their marketing circle as well, not just kind of keeping it within one platform.

Speaker 2:

Exactly, and we have a ton of integrations, whether with different e-commerce platforms or with different social media platforms. You'll see, we're Google partners, so we really have the ability to display those reviews on all different in all different places so that they can be seen the most.

Speaker 1:

How, if you're looking at it from a merchant's perspective, first of all, how important is having kind of reviews campaign as part of your e-commerce strategy?

Speaker 2:

It's extremely important. I'm sure everybody listening is an online shopper. Everyone's gone through the process themselves, everyone's had their own customer journey, and the vast majority of shoppers 90% in particular won't buy a product that doesn't have reviews. They're not just important for conversion, though. High quality reviews also help brands ensure what we like to call a valuable first purchase, meaning that the customer is able to find and buy the perfect product for them, increasing the likelihood that they'll return. Of course, we always want them to come back, and this is just looking, then, at reviews. I'm sure we'll dive in a little bit after to loyalty and referrals, but YachtPot does also offer loyalty and referrals, where we do incentivize those customers to keep coming back.

Speaker 1:

I've got to say I've used reviews as a way of helping me make a decision around the product to buy, because most recently it was with a running armband my phone holder broke.

Speaker 1:

I had to buy a new one, so I was wondering whether to buy a holder or a sleeve to put my phone in and I basically went on reviews, as in what one's got the highest number of reviews or maybe the highest score, based on the reason of amount of reviews. And that helped me make the decision, because I can read so many blog posts, I can read so many articles on different online magazines about holders. But at the end of the day, if you get the proof from people that have bought that to say it fits, it doesn't fit, it doesn't hold its shape, it isn't waterproof or whatever, it can help make that decision. So from a customer perspective, it helped me make a choice that I felt other people had already made for me and maybe I benefited from their experience. But I guess from the flip side also, because we see this with kind of NPS scores, it gives the merchant the opportunity to understand what their customers like or don't like about a particular product or service Exactly, exactly.

Speaker 2:

That, too. Another interesting part of it is so you of course didn't want to buy another phone holder, right, that was potentially going to break. So you were going to read through the reviews and make sure. Okay, this one could last me longer, this one won't break. We also have the ability to have a question and answer community section on the product page. So not only can you read and write reviews, but you can also read and write questions. So if you had a question and you wanted to say what's better this phone holder or the sleeve, the one that latches on to my arm or it latches on to my belt, you could ask that question and not only could the brand themselves go back and answer, but the actual community and any other customer that has made that purchase could go back and answer too. So you can get real time answers from not only the brand but from other customers who bought that product.

Speaker 1:

I find with some merchants they're a bit hesitant to kind of embrace the reviews because they or if they do, it's kind of on their terms they don't really want to hear the truth.

Speaker 1:

So it's kind of like can we edit them, Can we manage them? Can we hide the ones that are negative? And the problem with that is you're not getting the well. First of all, you're not holding yourself accountable. So if your service is really poor, you're basically masking it, saying we're just not going to tell people that we're that poor rather than doing something about it. But secondly, you're not getting kind of actual feedback from your customers or you're not embracing it and potentially also you're not, you're not being honest with as part of your brand. I mean, one of the values should be kind of honest and transparency and you're really not. So how important is it for actually, we can go to that later, but kind of from a let's go back to kind of managing reviews then how, what are the best ways to kind of have those on your website? Where do you see merchants winning when they're displaying or promoting reviews on their e-commerce websites?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, definitely. So it's important to display both your good and your bad reviews. Of course, like we just said, a lot of brands are going to want to just display their good reviews. But that's just not realistic to get all five star reviews unless your product is truly unbelievable and maybe you've gotten bad reviews in the past and you've made those corrections and now you have all five star reviews. But that's likely not the case.

Speaker 2:

So if shoppers see all five star reviews on a product, that's likely a red flag, and bad reviews help customers make more informed decisions. So, for example, if I want to buy a dress and somebody left a review that said it runs small, I'll go a size up and I'll likely be more satisfied with my purchase and more likely to leave a positive review and then probably purchase again. So you'd want that review displayed because otherwise I'd be unhappy if I didn't see that it ran small. I ordered my normal size. It was too small. I returned it. I was like I don't know if I'm even going to exchange it then for the bigger size. So also, if it makes sense then for your brand to collect photos, collect videos that's another great part of our user generated content.

Speaker 2:

Exactly, exactly, and this helps to overcome the biggest problem e-commerce brands have, which is that shoppers can't experience the product in real life before buying. So if you see real people using your product in real environments, it helps to boost conversion, because then shoppers can really visualize it in their lives too.

Speaker 1:

I guess you're making it a bit more emotive and putting the potential buyer in that frame of mind to say, okay, this is what the actual product is going to look like, rather than kind of a photoshopped lifestyle image or something that's kind of quite set up. This is the bare bones. We hear about UGC, user generated content, mostly around social, but, as you say, the question and answers feature as well, where you can get your community to put that content in there and you've basically got real life fans, hopefully promoting your product and showing you the photos of the product and use or in the environment. But conversely, you can also get ones that show that it maybe broke apart or it doesn't hold its eyes or whatever, and I think that's one of the challenges that merchants come up against is that I don't really have the bandwidth to deal with that.

Speaker 1:

I have to stay on top and firefight anything that you know. You get one disgruntled customer that's just going to, you know, expend all their energy on trying to kind of take you down and say I don't want to deal with that. So actually, how do I prevent that problem? Well, I just hide, you know, the ability for them to be able to write reviews or upload user generated content. But I think also, like you say, it's A, it can help somebody make a decision. So if a medium or if a small is going to be maybe too small, then maybe you move up to medium. But also it shows the brand is genuine, like you're not masking anything, you're transparent and you're honest, and I think that's especially in a day where bad news can travel so fast.

Speaker 1:

I mean, if we go back to 30 years, if you're a company that sold really bad shirts, it would take months or years for that kind of reputation to now take minutes on, you know, and so really I think it's got to be part of that strategy for a merchant to stay on top of how their brand is perceived and their reputation, and obviously there's tools out there. But I think, as the commerce buyer kind of matures to understand the commerce a lot more, the commerce customer, you acknowledge that not everyone's going to have a 10 out of 10 experience, and I guess fundamentally just touching on maybe negative reviews, so what should merchants do if they do get kind of some not so favorable feedback that's published online?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So if you do get not great feedback, we do have the option also for brands to respond privately to a customer that left a bad review, and that gives you the opportunity to speak directly to that customer and understand what went wrong, how can you help them and how really we can turn around that experience. So that's really. Another great aspect of our platform is the ability to respond back to reviews, whether publicly or privately. You have both options, and maybe then you want to offer them a discount code for their next product and offer something that they will like based on what their review is. Maybe that product just wasn't for them. And then I'd say there's also going to be ways that businesses can use these reviews whether they're good or bad, but to then improve their products or services.

Speaker 1:

I think that feedback is really good, because one thing that a lot of merchants don't do is kind of market research, and so this, I guess, is the second best thing, because you're getting their feedback from the users and they're telling you what works or doesn't work. Because, also, if you're testing your product in a fairly contained environment and not kind of in the real world, you're not getting the real-life feedback that you might need to develop that. So using systems like reviews, like you say, is a good way, because it's somebody that's actually used that and said it doesn't hold its size, it doesn't fit. The threading starts to come off after three runs, which is what happened to my thing, and so that kind of feedback, I guess, is invaluable. And if you put yourself in a situation and say, ok, how would I otherwise get that feedback from a user or from however many users you've got?

Speaker 1:

I guess there's also costs attached to that. So really, what's the best option? Do you kind of invest in something like Yoppo, where you get feedback from customers that have used it, or do you go out to a market research company and start doing all that research campaigns and investing money in there? So I think that's a really good point. You say as well using the feedback to improve your product or service or understand from a customer what works and what doesn't.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, definitely. And Yoppo has a smart sentiment algorithm that analyzes a brand's reviews and automatically identifies positive and negative reviewer sentiment. So, for example, a beauty retailer could quickly learn that their bestselling eyeshadow has a trend of negative sentiment around the topic of scent. People love their eyeshadow but they hate the smell. So then that brand knows that they need to improve that aspect of the product. So keep that color, keep that consistency of the eyeshadow, but work on the smell. It gives you that opportunity to figure out what you need to do to improve that product and maybe to get then that five star review.

Speaker 1:

So that's really interesting because if you compare kind of to other systems that are just purely a platform to say fundamentally, rate our product from one to five, and then it just gives you the rating. You're actually kind of saying look, here are some trends around what people like and what they don't like, so you can continue to improve that product and start pushing up that rating.

Speaker 1:

You've obviously got well many, many customers globally. Are there any kind of success stories or case studies where a merchant or a brand has kind of harnessed the reviews and really seen a significant change in the way that their business operates or grows?

Speaker 2:

Definitely. We have a really great case study and we actually have a section on our website too, with all case studies, if anybody wanted to read through more but one in particular is from a sustainable and inclusive outdoor apparel brand for women. The company brand is ACAI and they have a premium price point where they relied heavily on organic growth via word of mouth marketing from customers. They knew that customer feedback was key to their success and they needed an efficient way to transform feedback into actionable insights. So what they did was they had an inclusive community that had a strong foundation, but they needed a way to harness the enthusiasm of their customers. So they explored various review providers. They ultimately chose YachtPo, and we allowed them to implement reviews and visual UGC alongside SMS.

Speaker 2:

So once they set up reviews, their review collection accelerated and they were simultaneously able to use YachtPo's Insight tool to really help refine and direct their product decisions based on valuable customer insights. So, for example, the mid-length trek shorts, which is a super popular item, were originally made in a shorter length. The Insight tool helps the brand transform customer feedback into actionable insights, which gave them the information that they needed to adjust the length of their shorts to better suit the needs of their shoppers. So after they do so, the shoppers are happier. They adjusted the length of their shorts and they're happier with the length, and if you were to applications to any area of major places, they could improve that they didn't know.

Speaker 1:

So basically they went out with the intention of kind of collecting or looking for a solution that helped them collect reviews, and actually they didn't just get the feedback engine, they actually got kind of the information they needed to continually improve that product.

Speaker 2:

Exactly, and that's just one of many case studies and examples. We have a ton more, whether it's in the fashion and apparel, brand, realm, health and beauty. You know you can really filter all of our case studies by different industries as well, so there will be a case study really per industry.

Speaker 1:

OK, we'll link to the case studies in the show notes so that listeners can have a read of how your other merchants have benefited through reviews. But reviews is just one part of the suite of products that Yoppo offers. So what else have you got when you're asking with tools to help merchants?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so Yoppo also offers visual marketing. We offer loyalty and referrals, we offer SMS marketing, we offer a subscription tool. We really have a ton of different products. We also offer email marketing. So all of these products. Really, what's amazing is they work together under one roof, so under one unified data layer, and they speak to each other. So, for example, as we've been talking about with reviews, maybe you want to give loyalty points to somebody for leaving a review and maybe you want to grant loyalty points for somebody that signs up for your SMS subscriber club and then, through that SMS, we can ask for review, we can promote different products, offer a discount code, pull in that five star rating, so you really have a ton of opportunities to use this cross product synergy.

Speaker 1:

I guess that the benefit to the merchant there is that you, like you said you've got that single data source. So you haven't got to connect different systems that maybe collect different metrics and make them talk to each other. You're basically saying we've got one unified profile for this customer and then, depending on which part of the Yoppo suite you use, they're all pulling from that same data and they can all talk to each other.

Speaker 1:

Exactly so unlike within the bigger e-commerce space, where we're seeing the composable piece, you're actually going the opposite and making it more monolithic and saying we can really become a true marketing platform for your brand because we've got all these different tools that can talk to each other, that can pull for the same data source, that can go hand in hand as well. Like you said, if somebody signs up for loyalty they can get or, sorry, for leisure review, they get some loyalty points, and I guess that can also be pulled through to things like email marketing and SMS. And SMS is a really interesting piece because it's like we seem to have gone back to 2004, where everyone's doing text messaging marketing.

Speaker 1:

But, actually, that's really coming to the forefront now as that email space becomes really saturated, I guess.

Speaker 2:

Definitely, sms marketing is huge and that's actually people that are choosing to communicate via SMS are choosing that because that's their preferred way of communication. So for me, for example I have my phone on me at all times I choose SMS because then let's say that I am quickly shopping for something I said, oh, I know that I have actually this discount code in my text. Let me just look at my text. I'm choosing to use my phone as my preferred way of communication, so I'm signing up for SMS. If you don't prefer to do that, then totally fine, you won't sign up for SMS. But many I mean I'm sure you see it and when you walk on the street these days, everyone's bumping into each other because everyone's just looking out at their phone at least in New.

Speaker 2:

York City they are, but.

Speaker 1:

I don't know what to say.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, everyone's on their phones these days.

Speaker 1:

The other great thing about from a brand perspective if your customers are willing to give you their mobile numbers, their cell phone numbers, it also shows an element of trust because they're quite intimate Things are mobile phones and so if we're actually kind of giving you our phone number so you can market to us, it's showing that we trust you and we kind of want to engage with you more as a brand. Number one. Number two I think the kind of interaction rates, engagement rates on phone are much higher and also I think most SMS messages are open within three minutes of receipt, which is nothing like for email marketing. So I think from that perspective, if you're looking for some really good engagement, then SMS is the way to go.

Speaker 2:

It's true. It's true, I mean, once you get a text message, everybody jumps and quickly opens their phone. You hear that ding all the time and, as annoying as it is, we all do it and we all click on the phone and whether it's a vibrate, it's a ding. Whatever it is, we open up that text message right away.

Speaker 1:

And probably action it, rather than just kind of market spam or just look at the inbox and you've got 50 unread emails and just do nothing about it. I mean I don't think I've got more than three or four unread texts at a time.

Speaker 2:

And if I open up a text and it shows me a product that has, you can really input even the star rating in there. So it could say this lipstick is five stars and maybe I'm out to dinner and I'm like actually I don't really like the lipstick that I have in my bag. And they just gave me a discount code on this five star lipstick. Let me just order it quickly.

Speaker 1:

Here's the link to order. So could you mind giving us an example of how SMS, how Merchant might kind of utilize SMS to boost those conversions or to kind of get that customer to buy? Yeah?

Speaker 2:

I mean, as you said, if you're signing up for SMS, that means that you're trusting and you're giving that personal phone number and so if you're choosing that, then you're choosing to communicate on a personal level and so, in amazing way, not only to boost conversion, but it would be. I mean, there's a ton of different ways. Whether you want to, as I said, insert those reviews right within that text message, you want to ask for a review within that text message, maybe you want to refer a friend, and when you refer a friend you get loyalty points and then you can use those loyalty points to get a discount on that lipstick that I just got a discount code for. That was five stars. You have a ton of different ways in which we can use, as we said, all of our products together. So SMS, in particular, is an amazing way to pull it all together, because I can insert all of those different aspects right in a text message, right at the most personal way of communication, right on.

Speaker 2:

You know, somebody's usually holding that phone right in their pocket, right on their body, and so, whether it's asking for a review in there, inserting reviews, providing a discount code, maybe somebody is 10 points away from reaching their next VIP tier, and on that next VIP tier you're about to get free shipping on every order that you purchase. So here's a product that will get you those 10 points. So there's a ton of different ways in which we can use SMS really to increase purchases at that super personal level, and we can tailor it to your personal interests. We know, then. We know what you like. We know a lot about you.

Speaker 1:

So I was about to say that it's not just kind of again like other email marketing platforms or marketing platforms. It is tailoring the messaging and those campaigns to the user. And because you've got that single kind of customer data profile, you're able to then segment your emails and say I know that you buy this type of product or this type of brand, that, like you said, your X number of points away maybe from the next tier, and so you can use all those different attributes to really target that user, to get the highest conversion, highest engagement for your marketing efforts.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and we do have a huge library of automations and flows. Whether a brand wants to choose from those that we offer because of course you're going to want that card abandonment flow when somebody you know abandons their product in their cart and we want to then send out a text message and offer a discount on that product, we have that welcome flow. We have a huge library for you to choose from. But then of course you can also be creative and make your own automation simple as but we give you a great starting point and we give you all all the basics that you might need. But you can also really be creative there with with your SMS.

Speaker 1:

I think that's really important because a lot of merchants sometimes find it becomes a battle to kind of keep on top of these things.

Speaker 1:

So the fact that you kind of say look, you know the platforms there, you know you can either kind of self serve with some off the shelf ideas and flows or, if you need that you know kind of customization and you need to get down into the trenches and start mapping everything out and really telling it.

Speaker 1:

Then you can do that as well. So there is because sometimes you kind of speak to some platforms and it's it's either you know kind of self serve or they do the onboarding for you, not necessarily kind of reviews, but just in general, and sometimes that can be a bit of putting for a merchant, of putting for a merchant because then I don't have the bandwidth. Today I could do with that product, I could do with that, that technology, that service, but I'm not going to be able to commit to or I don't understand enough. I've got to bring in more resources. So the fact that kind of your pose got this flexibility to be able to support the merchants say look, you know you can, you can kind of come in on self on board, you know off the shelf, and then when you get to understand how the system works, when you start seeing those benefits, you can start tweaking and tailoring those things to really start accelerating your your conversions.

Speaker 2:

Exactly, and you can have those automation set up too, so you won't have to manually do it all.

Speaker 1:

Brilliant Are you? Are you kind of seeing any trends in with any commerce within the market or anything that's kind of you see is coming around the corner that maybe our merchants can take some inspiration from?

Speaker 2:

Definitely the biggest change that we're seeing is brands focusing more on customer retention, so realizing that you need to move the needle on retention and actually doing it. Are two different things, though, so, in fact, we recently surveyed e-commerce brands and 52% of them said that they were more focused on retention than they were a year ago, but over 40% haven't made any changes to their strategy in order to improve it. So why haven't they? 34% said their biggest challenge is the lack of a clear strategy, so our takeaway from that data is that brands know how important retention is, but it's unclear on how to really get it started, and without a solid strategy, you're left with a hopefully they liked us enough to come back approach, which clearly isn't working.

Speaker 2:

70% of those surveyed said their retention rate has either stayed the same or gotten worse over the past year. So with rising acquisition costs, I think we're going to see more brands beef up their retention strategies with subscriptions and loyalty programs and deeper personalization and really just leveraging data to better understand their customers so that they can build those winning experiences that keep them coming back, and all things that brands can do with Yacht Po, by the way.

Speaker 1:

That's a really important piece you said there around, kind of the data, because I think again not to kind of harp on about it but the fact that you've got a single source of truth for that customer profile. Because we're in on data with data right at the moment these days, it's just at the moment everyone's kind of panicking about GA4. I think 90% of the world is probably asking itself why, when Universal Analytics was fine, it's just, it's just it's about the data and obviously it's got so many benefits. But the problem is that there is an element of kind of paralysis by analysis, because it's just there's so much data out there and the fact that you're not making merchants say, well, you know, putting data from this system for subscriptions, pulling data from this system for loyalty and referrals, this one for reviews and this one for email marketing, but you actually got that unified profile with the analytics, I think helps make life easier for the merchants and, like you say, you know and everyone knows it's far cheaper to sell to an existing customer than acquire a new one and marketing costs are going up and all these things.

Speaker 1:

And I think you know you've done the hard work. If a customer is buying from you like that. Well, you've kind of done some hard work. The hard work is end to keep them and keep them coming back. But the point being that you've got the ability to do that with an out of the box solution that that makes it easier to retain as customers without having to necessarily create an in-depth customer retention strategy, can really only only lead to a high, you know, like a positive ROI, because you're not having to self serve and self create these systems. Like it's just, these systems are out of the box, they're there to help you and, like you say, you know if 40% of merchants haven't got that strategy in place, well, you know, go visit your phone and your lease halfway there Exactly.

Speaker 2:

I couldn't have said it better myself.

Speaker 1:

So I like to finish off with a question that or rather, let me reword that Verena likes to finish off the podcast by asking people what book they've read or what podcast they're listening to. So I'm hoping you've read a book in the last few months, but then, if you have, would you mind telling us what that was?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I actually did just read a book. This is a book that I read just on my last vacation, which actually was my honeymoon a week ago, and I read the Personal Librarian. It's actually about JP Morgan's Personal Librarian and it was an amazing book, highly recommend. It was a perfect length, perfect amount of history with a story and, for me personally, being based in New York, the library is still here, so I then went to visit it after I finished the book.

Speaker 1:

Well, we'll have to find that and link to it in the show notes. If people want to learn more about Yachtpo and kind of get in touch, what should they do?

Speaker 2:

Feel free, honestly, to reach out directly to me. You can add me on LinkedIn at Charlotte Bell. You can also email me directly. My email is Cbell at Yachtpocom. Very easy, so that's C-B-E-L-L at Yachtpocom and I'm happy to answer any questions and work with anybody that's interested.

Speaker 1:

Brilliant. And just to kind of go over again, which e-commerce platforms do you integrate with?

Speaker 2:

We integrate with most e-commerce platforms, so we actually we can link out a page to our integrations from here and we integrate with everything from Shopify, big commerce, woocommerce. We have a ton of different integrations that I can share with everybody.

Speaker 1:

So you cover most of the platforms.

Speaker 2:

Exactly, and if there's not an integration, then we do have the ability to create that integration.

Speaker 1:

And obviously you've got APIs as well.

Speaker 2:

Exactly, you can use our APIs.

Speaker 1:

Brilliant. Charlotte, thank you very much for your time. It's been really interesting learning about how well kind of what Yachtpo offers, but also how your merchants can kind of benefit from using reviews and loyalty and SMS marketing and the like. So I've really enjoyed our conversation.

Speaker 2:

Me too. I hope all of us have as well.

Speaker 1:

This was great, and I look forward to catching up with you soon.

Speaker 2:

Me too, Thanks Luigi.

Speaker 1:

No worries, thank you very much. Bye, bye-bye. Thank you for listening to the BigCommerce podcast. If you've enjoyed today's episode, please leave us a review on your favorite podcast platform and if you want to follow us on social media, you can find us on Instagram, at the bigcommerce podcast, and also on LinkedIn. Alternatively, you can catch up on all older episodes on our website. If you've got ideas for any episodes, please reach out to us. Until next time, thank you for listening.

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